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Help for vets: Trump deploys more firepower against suicides



Members of the armed forces put their lives on the line for the nation, so it’s only appropriate that the federal government does all it can to protect them from post-service psychiatric problems. President Donald Trump sent that message Tuesday with an executive order enhancing mental health services for recently discharged veterans. Suicide rates among former service members remain high, especially among those fresh out of uniform, and all reasonable efforts to stanch the epidemic are worth making.

Mr. Trump’s order makes a wide range of mental health services available to all veterans as they transition back to civilian society. Until now, a full complement of services was available only to about 40 percent of those recently discharged, most of them from the combat ranks. But any service member returning to civilian life can encounter problems with employment, relationships or changes in routine that increase the odds of suicide. The best approach is to make services available to all.

Importantly, the president’s order not only authorizes services for all veterans during their transition periods but directs Cabinet-level agencies to ensure those services are plentiful and available. For example, Mr. Trump directed the Department of Veterans Affairs to expand its use of telemedicine, which has the potential to connect veterans with care no matter where they live, and its use of technology that allows former service members to schedule appointments online.

Veterans also may schedule appointments in the private sector if the VA system cannot serve them quickly enough — an important allowance given the VA’s past failures to provide prompt treatment. One important resource may be the nonprofit Give an Hour, which arranges for mental health professionals to donate services to veterans and members of their families.

Mr. Trump’s order builds on other efforts, some predating his administration, to stem the mental health crisis among veterans.

In 2016, the government released a three-year study showing the benefits of a certain kind of talk therapy in helping veterans manage post-traumatic stress disorder. Also in 2016, it issued a report documenting the scope of the suicide problem. The report, updated last year, found that the suicide rate for veterans was considerably higher than that of the average population; that in 2014, an average of 20 veterans took their lives each day; and that suicide was most common among veterans 29 and younger and lowest among those 60 and older. The report provided state-by-state data, showing that Pennsylvania’s rate mirrored the nation’s but was considerably above that for the Northeast.

As the government moves to implement Mr. Trump’s order, officials should remember that making services available is not always sufficient. Many of those who took their lives already were receiving VA care of one kind or another, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has estimated that only half of veterans needing mental health care seek treatment. The government must continue riding herd on recently discharged veterans, promoting mental health care among those who might be reluctant to seek it and constantly assessing the quality of care provided to those who did ask for help.

Mubashir Khatri Success life. Making people successful in a changing world. Ranks feed

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Donald Trump

Trump Lawyer Sends Cease-And-Desist Letter To Steve Bannon



A lawyer for President Donald Trump sent a cease-and-desist letter to Steve Bannon on Wednesday after the former White House chief strategist’s incendiary comments about the Trump presidency were revealed in a forthcoming book.

ABC News was the first to obtain the letter in which attorney Charles Harder said Bannon broke the terms of a “confidentiality and non-disparagement agreement” he had signed when he joined Trump’s presidential campaign in August 2016.

Bannon had “breached the Agreement by, among other things, communicating with author Michael Wolff about Mr. Trump, his family members, and the Company [the campaign], disclosing Confidential Information to Mr. Wolff, and making disparaging statements and in some cases outright defamatory statements to Mr. Wolff about Mr. Trump, his family members.”

Harder confirmed to HuffPost on Wednesday evening that the letter had been sent to Bannon.

In a statement provided to ABC, Harder said Bannon’s comments for the book “give rise to numerous legal claims including defamation by libel and slander.” He said legal action was imminent.

Bannon’s explosive claims were first reported by The Guardian on Wednesday after the outlet obtained a review copy of Michael Wolff’s book “Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House,” set to be released Tuesday. In interviews with Wolff, Bannon suggested that Trump was aware of a meeting his son Donald Trump Jr. had with Russian operatives at Trump Tower in June 2016 and that the then-candidate met with the delegation himself. Bannon also described the meeting as “treasonous” and “bad shit.”

“Even if you thought that this was not treasonous, or unpatriotic, or bad shit, and I happen to think it’s all of that, you should have called the FBI immediately,” Bannon told Wolff, according to The Guardian.

Trump unleashed a furious denial of Bannon’s claims on Wednesday, saying his former adviser had “lost his mind” and alleging the former campaign chief had “very little to do with our historic victory.”

“Steve Bannon has nothing to do with me or my Presidency,” Trump said in a statement, which also accused Bannon of leaking information to the media. “When he was fired, he not only lost his job, he lost his mind.”

Harder’s letter sent Wednesday also said Bannon could be liable for monetary damages.

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