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Complete Guide To Windsurfing For A Beginner

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When it comes to exhilarating water sports, windsurfing is always on the list Windsurfing has similar attributes to sailing but the difference being an individual stands on a board and holds a sail connected with the board.

Windsurfing is easy and fun, like anything, when you know how to do it. When you are a beginner, the best way to learn the activity is to get a good instructor. Apart from that, there are many things that a beginner needs to consider before and while windsurfing.

Lesson 1: How To Windsurf

Before getting into the water, it is necessary to ensure that you are doing the activity under the watchful eye of an experienced instructor. In addition, you need to check your windsurfing equipment list to make sure you are performing the activity safely. After checking the equipment, you can move to ‘how to windsurf’.

  • First, understand the wind direction to adjust the board.

  • Next, pull the sail up. It should be pulled to a point of only touching the water.

  • Next step is to take the right sailing position. Here, you need to keep the front arm straight and keep your weight on the back foot. This is the perfect position to save energy during windsurfing. Apart from that, make sure that you keep your body straight.

Lesson 2: How To Turn Back

Knowing how to turn around is obviously an important part of windsurfing. Making a left or right turn, you need to pull the sail in that direction. Here, you need to remember that the sail will try to keep itself in the direction of the wind. When you try to shift it to the left, the board turns clockwise to ensure the sail remains in the direction of the wind.

Lesson 3: How To Move In The Right Direction

As we know, the wind can affect the direction by pushing the sail, it is necessary to use counteracting force to avoid drifting downwind. This can be done by applying the force through the board. This makes it easy to surf in the right direction.

Lesson 4: How To Tack

The way a windsurfer tacks on a big board with a big sail is different from tacking on small windsurfing boards with small sails. In the case of big boards, you can use the space to float. However, this is not the case when you are windsurfing on a small board because they don’t come with a spare volume. To tack:

  • Start with ensuring that your front hand is on the mast while the front foot is in the position in front of the mast-foot. When ensured, it’s time to lower the clew to water.

  • Now, bring the clew back over the board’s back while ensuring that your weight is on the front foot. It is the time when the sail will be on the new side. Take advantage of the sail and quickly switch the side.

  • Once the new position is acquired, lean the mast forward.

Lesson 5: How To Gybe

In this guide for windsurfing for beginners, gybe is the last lesson to learn.

  • You can start by leaning the sail forward.

  • Now, put your front foot behind the back foot and place your weight on it.

  • Lean the mast forward and down, and keep turning the board.

  • Now, shift the sail.

Final Words

Although the beginner’s guide makes you aware of essential things to consider when trying Florida underwater sports, the best way to learn windsurfing is through an experienced instructor. This expert will give you important lessons and tell about necessary windsurfing equipment to perform the activity in the safest way.

Micheal Anderson is a Web expert and blogger by hobby, currently he is working with Techmagnate in the Boston, USA.

Culture & Arts

Antique silverware: Its Background and Value.

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Nowadays, the term “silverware” refers to a wide range of items, including jewelry, antique silver tea caddies, flatware, silver handled baskets, porringers, coins, and silver medals or trophies, among many others. However, times have changed dramatically since the Georgian, Victorian, and Edwardian periods, when antique silverware was used on a daily basis primarily by the wealthy or royalty.

Silverware was made as early as the 12th century, and cutlery and flatware became extremely popular and fashionable only a short time later. The antique silverware items that have survived to this day were made from the same grade of silver used in coinage.

Many ordinary people outside of the nobility amassed vast personal fortunes very quickly during the Industrial Revolution, and the upper middle class emerged. Beginning in the 1840s, these “new money” people invested heavily in silverware in order to flaunt their wealth. People stopped eating with their fingers in the Victorian era and began using knives and forks, which were naturally made of silver for the newly wealthy. During this time, English flatware silversmiths found themselves extremely busy serving both the European and American markets.

Just as we collect labor-saving devices today, the upper middle classes collected sterling silver utensils as symbols of wealth but also for everyday use. Silver tea services, tea caddies, coffee pots, fruit baskets, sugar bowls, milk jugs, and countless other pieces of flatware and cutlery could be found throughout Victorian homes.

As can be seen in large antique silver collections, the Victorian period saw silver at its peak, but there was a remarkable decline at the start of WWII, not least due to a lack of technology in machinery to make the items. Historically, all sterling silverware was handcrafted and stamped by machine. During the Great Depression, labor costs were higher, and even wealthy households began to feel the pinch. They used fewer servants, didn’t host as many large dinner parties, and silver maintenance was a major task. Hand polishing sterling silver took time, especially on ornate and intricately designed pieces. Hence Flatware gained popularity because it was much easier to polish and maintain.

Silver’s value fluctuates as a precious metal, but for antique silver collectors, finding perfectly preserved Georgian, Edwardian, and Victorian silverware in perfect condition is a joy. Drinking from a silver goblet and using silver knives, forks, and spoons at a dinner party feels decadent. Serving coffee from a sterling silver coffee pot that has been in use for well over a century puts some of our porcelain and china counterparts to shame.

Antique silverware will always be valuable as an investment, and even if the price of silver falls, you can be certain that it will rise again in the future. Unfortunately, the demand for silver exceeds the supply, and some of the exquisite silver pieces that can occasionally be found in antique markets or hidden away in the attic are sold for scrap and melted down, a process that simply destroys the work of England’s great silversmiths as well as a piece of our history.

Bernard Warner has amassed an impressive collection of antique silver over the course of many years, becoming a renowned collector of Georgian silver from the reigns of George I, George II, and George III. Part of his vast collection, including pieces from the Queen Anne, William IV, Victorian, and Edwardian eras, is now for sale. Some pieces date from 1711.

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