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Torrone – The Oldest Christmas Sweet

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The most common Italian nougat torrone is white nougat made with honey and beaten egg. The word nougat was first mentioned in Cristoforo di Messisbugo’s work in the 16th century. This is one of the most complex and that’s why the most interesting Christmas sweets in Italy. The origins of other Italian Christmas sweets such as panettone and pandoro are known. However, the origin of nougat is disputable.

It is not easy to present the origin and history of this Christmas sweet in an order. This Christmas cake has various formulas and recipes. It can be soft or hard. It can be chocolate or white. However, its 4 common denominators include egg white, honey, sugar and almonds.

Let’s see the origin and history of nougat.

The Roman Dessert

The ancient nougat was popular in the Sannio area. Romans used to make this sweet with almonds honey and egg whites. Sellers selling nougat in the area of Benevento are known as cupetari. Honey with dried fruit was used in making a lot of other Roman sweets. Some people trace their origin to China. However, their claims are weak.

Arabic or Spanish Origins

The tradition of Benevento is passed through Montefalcone di Val Fortore, Santa Croce del Sannio and San Marco dei Cavoti. People living in these towns produce a type of nougat which is white and crumbly, white and soft, white but covered in chocolate. The area of Sannio was a part of the Bourbon domain. A special nougat was produced for Neapolitan Royals and the Pope. The link between cupedia/torrone/cupeta and southern Italy dates back to Spanish or Arabic domain. It is difficult to say whether credit of introducing to Italy should be given to Arabs or Spanish. However, if it originated in the region of Iberian; it must be brought in Spain by the Arabs. People were informed that nougat was a stimulating food good for health.

A doctor from Cordoba described it as a healthy mixture of sugar, almonds, honey and various spices. A version of nougat can be found in all countries that were once ruled by the Arabs. Africans used to make with small black dates and very dark honey. In the west of Sicily, nougat is called cubbaita and in the east, it is known as giuggiulena.

France

France can also be the place of origin of nougat in 1260. It is said that Carlo D’Angiò’s cook brought nougat to Italy. Made from almonds and honey, it became popular in Southern Italy. In the 18th century, it reached Rome.

The Cremona Origins

Notoriously, Cremona is the home of nougat. The date of the marriage between Bianca Maria Visconti and Francesco Sforza and the date of the birth of nougat coincides: October 25, 1441. On the occasion of the wedding, a dessert was served and that dessert was very similar to Arab nougat. However, they added egg white to it. In honor of the city’s bell tower, Torrazzo of Cremona, it was given the name torrone. In 1543 Cremona nougat was in the news for the first time when the municipality bought and donated to the Milanesi. Its popularity increased in the nineteenth century.

Why do we eat nougat at Christmas?

It has something to do with the cultivation of almonds. Almonds are harvested at the end of the summer. In addition to this, during the winter, there was not much work in the fields. So, peasants were confectioners as well. The sale of nougat is increased at Christmas time.

So, this is the information we have about the origin of Italian nougat torrone. You can find easy Italian nougat torrone recipes online. You must try.

Micheal Anderson is a Web expert and blogger by hobby, currently he is working with Techmagnate in the Boston, USA.

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Food & Drink

Ikea large chair with your pretty add-ons

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it’s no key that Ikea is a good position to purchase inexpensive child products. But here’s one way to modify one of their hottest items.

Recognize this large chair? It’s no key that Ikea is a good position to purchase child products. And at $25 (currently available for sale in Europe for $19.99), the Ikea Antelop large chair is hard to beat. It’s wipeable, the feet come down and you may even bunch them. But similar to the chair, the Ikea-made components for the Antilop are pretty basic.

Enter Yeah Child Goods.

Frustrated by the hard to remove tray, very roomy seat—and the fact that nothing of the Ikea components participate in the decor of her house, mompreneur Katie Kruithof decided to give her chair an upgrade. She designed dishwasher safe, food-grade silicone placemats to match perfectly in to the prevailing tray, which is often removed for quick clean-up. Next came designer cloth covers for the Antilop chair place (available from Ikea for $5). In 2016, she exposed an Etsy store and started selling the products to different Ikea-loving parents.

In 2019, she included adjustable base sits in bamboo, maple and cherry wood to give the chair the perfect concluding touch. Notice: occupational counselors agree that large chairs without base sits can be detrimental to mealtime achievement as it leaves baby’s feet hanging, which is often rather uncomfortable.

While plenty of different hacks of the Antilop chair exist on the web (this one employs a cheap exercise group to make a pseudo base rest), Kruithof easily has one of the very visually attractive approaches.

  • Have a look at a several items under (Pinterest moms, you have been informed!):
  • A social justice-themed support cover.

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