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Grammy-Award Winning Artist Kimbra Releases Uplifting Protest Song for Girls' Education – Global Citizen

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Grammy award-winning artist Kimbra released an original song to launch the No Girl Left Behind initiative with the international education nonprofit So They Can on Friday.
The upbeat track shines a spotlight on the changes Kenyan girls want to see in their communities to stop harmful practices like child marriage and female genital mutilation (FGM) and aims to raise $75,000 to support girls’ education. 
Kimbra, a New Zealand-born, New York-based artist who made waves after featuring on Gotye’s 2011 single “Somebody That I Used to Know,” isn’t new to supporting humanitarian initiatives in East Africa. After taking several trips to Ethiopia with the organization Tirzah, she jumped at the chance to work on a campaign in the region that specifically targeted women and children and has been a So They Can ambassador since 2013.
Across sub-Saharan Africa, as many as 40% of girls married before the age of 18, and the COVID-19 pandemic is putting millions more at risk. Education can make all the difference –– each additional year of secondary school significantly reduces a girl’s risk for child marriage.
Kimbra hopes No Girl Left Behind helps drive home the power of schooling to transform a girls’ life. 
“I would love for the song to create a feeling of community and motivation in people here in America or wherever the song reaches,” Kimbra told Global Citizen. 

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“Music has this power to create a feeling of a transcendent moment in us. When we feel transcendent, we often go, ‘Oh, I want to do more. I want to give more. I can love more.’ If music can make you feel that, then you’re driven to be like, ‘Let me buy the song, engage with this organization, and maybe sponsor a young girl or give directly to the campaign.’ If I could shift people’s perception of what they can do, that would be wonderful.”
When approached with the project, Kimbra wanted to ensure the songwriting process would be a collaborative one. She met with a group of Kenyan schoolgirls impacted by So They Can via Zoom and listened to their stories about the discriminatory traditions and beliefs they have been forced to endure. Many of them shared that their mothers and sisters disowned them after they advocated for themselves and fought against the norms. 
Still, the musician couldn’t help but notice the level of joy they emitted. 
“That’s what shines through in these girls. They’re bosses, they’re queens,” she said. ”I wanted to portray their strength and their protest. The takeaway was, we’re changing the game, and we need help.” 

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Rather than create a heartfelt ballad about suffering after reflecting on her conversations with the schoolgirls, Kimbra opted to go in a more uplifting direction. Drawing inspiration from pop star Janet Jackson, she wrote the powerful lyrics “I won’t let you cut into my dignity,” and “I want the choice not to be chosen.” 
“These girls are chosen to be brides. They are chosen to receive the dowry in exchange. I wanted to speak to that,” she said of the affirming words she imagined young girls saying to the men trying to control their futures. 
Kimbra went back and forth on using the loaded word “cut” to discuss FGM, a practice that affects 8% of girls in East Africa, but ultimately decided not to “dance around the bush” and instead embodied the girls who aren’t shy about speaking up on the sensitive issue. 

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She also featured the schoolgirls singing a song about God’s gifts from a voice memo she took during one of their meetings.
“When they sing their songs, it’s just a young kid that comes out. You wouldn’t even believe what they’ve been through. That was what I wanted to capture — their play,” Kimbra said.
While she acknowledges her privilege as a white woman living in the US and that she will never fully be able to personify the challenges a young African girl faces, her goal was to make them feel heard.

“My main concern was just hoping that they would feel themselves in my lyrics and the way I sang, that they would feel the soul of that,” she said. 

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For Kimbra, it was imperative to empower the girls she spoke to by showing them how their story could get out and propel change. 
“When we speak out and model our freedom, it makes other women realize they can do that,” she said. “I flourished because of the power of other women to break the norm. I’m hoping that with these girls, by modeling it for their community, culture will change and the stories we tell girls will change.”

Global Citizen Life
Demand Equity
Jan. 14, 2022

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Carrots Have These 8 Amazing, Surprising Health Benefits

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Initially, the vegetable originated in the geological area and the Asian United States, and it was initially only available in purple and yellow hues. Carrots are an excellent source of beta carotene, a natural mineral introduced by the body to provide sustenance, and they are high in fibre.

Carrots, which are crunchy, orange, and delicious, provide a variety of benefits to our health, pores, skin, and hair. These don’t appear to be particularly tasty, but they are loaded with numerous important nutrients, for example, beta-carotene, cell reinforcements, potassium, fibre, sustenance K, and so on.

Carrots are cultivated to promote eye health, lower dangerous LDL cholesterol, and aid in weight loss. Let’s put it to the test and find out why carrots are so good for you!

The following are twelve effective edges you might get from carrots:

1. Supports gadget

Most importantly, carrots contain a few phytochemicals that are well-known for their cancer-causing properties. Carotenoids and carotenoids are present in more than one of these associations. Overall, compounds create resistance and activate specific proteins that prevent the growth of most tumor cells. An investigation reveals on a screen that carrot juice can also fight leukemia.

2. Advances Glowing Skin

Investigate tips that stop outcome, and vegetables well off in those composites will finish pores and pores and skin ground and work with people’s appearances, thus making them more noteworthy young.

3. Fortifies Bones

Carrots are high in vitamins, minerals, and cancer-fighting agents. Vitamins B6 and K, potassium, phosphorous, and other minerals contribute to bone health, a more durable, and help with mental performance. Aside from selling the body to free extreme annihilation, cancer prevention agents keep an eye on the casing in the course of dangerous microbes, infections, and diseases. Physical cell digestion is managed by the ophthalmic component. Carotenoids have been linked to improved bone health.

4. Advances Male physiological circumstance (ED)

These fruitfulness meals may increase the number of sperm cells and their motility. According to research, this is a direct result of the fake carotenoids found in carrots, which are responsible for the vegetable’s orange color. However, it is still unknown whether carrots can improve sperm enjoyment and motility. Carrots are being tried to improve food for male physiological conditions and erectile dysfunction. Cenforce FM and Cenforce D can be used to treat impotency.

5. Keeps From Cancer and Stroke

Carrots have an unusual endowment in that they are loaded down with anti-cancer resources that will depress the cells’ blast. Essentially, studies have discovered that carrots can reduce the risk of a variety of diseases, including colon, breast, and prostate cancer.

6. Further develops the natural framework Health

Carrots contain a significant amount of dietary fibre, which plays an important role in supporting healthy stomach function. Fibre expands your stool, allowing it to pass more easily through the stomach-related plot and preventing stoppage.

7. Assists with managing polygenic affliction and basic sign

Carrots are high in fibre, which promotes cardiovascular health by lowering LDL cholesterol levels in veins and blood vessels. Calcium is absorbed through the frame of carrots, resulting in low but dangerous cholesterol levels.

Carrots have an unbalanced fibre content. An investigation found that advanced fibre consumption improves aldohexose digestion in people with the polygenic disorder. Following a healthy, well-balanced diet and maintaining a healthy weight can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Inconsistencies in glucose digestion may require a high level to combat aerophilic strain, and this is frequently where the inhibitor nutrients dilettanti ophthalmic thing axerophthol fats-solvent sustenance may also benefit.

According to one review, juice provided a 5 wrinkle inside the beat fundamental sign. The supplements in carrot juice, with fibre, K, nitrates, and vitamin C, have all been obtained to help this final product.

8. Advances Healthy Heart

To begin with, each cancer prevention agent is beneficial to your coronary heart. Furthermore, at 0.33, they should contain fibre, which can help you stay in shape and lower your chances of having a heart attack.

9. Forestalls devolution

Edges that are hostile to ophthalmic detail ensure the floor of the eye and provide a sharp inventiveness and perception. Taking juice will help to delay many eye diseases, such as macular degeneration, cataracts, and visual impairment. Overall, carrots contain lutein, which is an inhibitor that protects the eye from obliterating light.

10. Works on urinary organ and Liver perform

Carrots contain glutathione. Cell reinforcement has been shown to be effective in treating liver disease caused by aerophilic strains. The greens are high in plant flavonoids and beta-carotene, both of which stimulate and develop your popular liver component. Carrots contain carotenoid, which can help fight liver problems.

11. Palatable Anti-Aging

Along with carrots on your regular food, you will appreciate limiting the way you get more seasoned. Furthermore, beta-carotene functions as an inhibitor that advances cell harm, which happens as a result of the casing’s normal digestion.

12. Advances Weight Loss

Uncooked Carrots are 88% water when raw or ebb and flow. A regular carrot has the lowest difficulty level of 25 energy. Taking everything into consideration, including carrots in your diet is a wise way to fuel yourself while collecting calories.

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