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How Germany Avoided A 'Lost' Year Of Schooling – NPR

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FromSt. Louis Public Radio
In the U.S., school closures during the pandemic have some worried about a “lost COVID generation” of children. But that’s not the case in Germany.
AILSA CHANG, HOST:
According to UNICEF, the world’s children lost an average of 47 school days between March and October. It’s one reason the organization is warning of a lost COVID generation of children. American schools are scrambling to address this, and they might look to Germany, where schools got kids back into classrooms early. In partnership with the Pulitzer Center, St. Louis Public Radio’s Ryan Delaney reports.
RYAN DELANEY, BYLINE: The children and teachers at Rainbowtrekkers kindergarten in Cologne start the school day with a rhyme.
UNIDENTIFIED PEOPLE: (Speaking German).
DELANEY: “Every day is new, and every day is different,” the children sing. But one thing that’s changed little for them this year – their daily presence in a classroom. Germany’s quick response to the pandemic in the spring allowed it to get some children back in schools after just a few weeks. And schools have remained open this fall, even as the country shut restaurants and gyms back down. Meanwhile, in some American cities, schools were shut down or remained closed, while gyms and restaurants stayed open. Jason Benedict, an American raising a family in Berlin, says he doesn’t feel like the school year has been disrupted the way his friends back in the U.S. talk about it.
JASON BENEDICT: It doesn’t seem like the kids are being left behind, and it doesn’t feel so much – as far as scholastics, it doesn’t feel like a lost year. And I’m very thankful for that.
DELANEY: Most German schoolchildren are required to wear masks during the day and not mix with kids outside their cohort. And when community spread gets too high, schools do shut down for a period of time. Iljana Lott, the director of a Berlin primary school, says she’s glad the government has prioritized keeping schools open.
ILJANA LOTT: (Speaking German).
DELANEY: She says the social aspects of schooling are too important.
Liana Schmidtke is in her final year of high school in the city of Osnabruck.
LIANA SCHMIDTKE: I couldn’t imagine being still in home schooling.
DELANEY: She remembers her school’s spring closure as a very dark time. If schools were still closed, she says…
SCHMIDTKE: Everything would’ve been so much differently now. Our grades would’ve probably dropped, and our whole motivation to actually continue studying for graduation would’ve been completely miserable.
DELANEY: Back in the spring, when German schools did shut down, researchers found that students spent less time studying and more time on their phones, playing computer games or watching TV. Alex Bucher, a principal of a secondary school in Bruhl, says the closures set his students back.
ALEX BUCHER: If you don’t learn as much as you could learn, you are behind. That’s a fact.
DELANEY: Online learning was also a challenge, in part because of a lack of digital infrastructure in German schools. Katharina Spiess (ph) studies education and economics at the Free University of Berlin. She says school disruptions in Germany have been more harmful to some students.
KATHARINA SPIESS: Children, students which are any way disadvantaged from lower-educated households, from lower-income households, students with lower grades – they will suffer much more.
DELANEY: That’s the case in the United States as well. About 3 million children have disappeared from American schools since March, according to a study by Bellwether Education Partners. Those children are more likely to live in low-income households or be English-language learners. By keeping schools open, Germany has kept many vulnerable students from falling through the cracks, but this winter will test the country’s success. Many teachers are nervous about higher case numbers. They’re calling for a switch to a hybrid teaching model that would keep classrooms half-full. But the government is pushing to keep schools fully open.
For NPR News, I’m Ryan Delaney in Berlin.
(SOUNDBITE OF JAMIE XX’S “OBVS”)
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Realm Scans: Navigating the Uncharted Territories of Digital Discovery

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In the expansive landscape of digital exploration, there exists a realm where information becomes an adventure—Realm Scans. Beyond a mere scanning service, this digital haven is where curiosity converges with innovation, and the uncharted territories of digital discovery come to life. Join us as we embark on a journey to unravel the unique dynamics of Realm Scans, navigating through the realms where information is not just scanned but transformed into a digital odyssey.

“Digital Horizons: Exploring the Essence of Realm Scans” is not just a title; it’s an exploration into the multifaceted dimensions of a scanning service that transcends the mundane. This article is an invitation to delve into the layers of technological prowess, user-centric design, and the transformative impact that defines Realm Scans in the dynamic world of digital information.

At the core of Realm Scans lies a commitment to redefining how we interact with information. “Digital Horizons” delves into the innovative features and functionalities that make Realm Scans more than just a scanning service. It’s a digital gateway where documents become gateways to exploration, and information is a portal to new discoveries.

A standout feature is the user-centric approach that defines the Realm Scans experience. “Digital Horizons” explores how user interface design, accessibility, and intuitive navigation are seamlessly integrated to create an environment where users don’t just scan documents—they embark on a digital journey of discovery.

Realm Scans is not confined by the traditional boundaries of scanning; it is a catalyst for a digital revolution. “Digital Horizons” illustrates how Realm Scans empowers users to go beyond the expected, transforming the act of scanning into a dynamic and enriching experience that transcends conventional notions.

As we navigate through the digital horizons of Realm Scans, the article becomes a celebration of the fusion between technology and user experience. It is a recognition that in the world of digital services, there are realms where functionality meets innovation, and where information is a gateway to new digital frontiers.

“Digital Horizons: Exploring the Essence of Realm Scans” is not just an article; it’s an ode to the tech enthusiasts, the information seekers, and the digital explorers who recognize the profound impact of a scanning service that goes beyond the surface. It’s an acknowledgment that in the realms of digital discovery, Realm Scans stands as a beacon, inviting users to embrace the transformative power of information in the digital age.

As Realm Scans continues to redefine the digital scanning landscape, “Digital Horizons” invites us to appreciate the nuances of a service that transforms the ordinary into the extraordinary—an exploration where every scan is not just a document but a digital adventure waiting to be unfolded.

Harry Clam

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