Connect with us

Business

Novak Djokovic: The politics behind Australia's decision – BBC News

Published

on

By Shaimaa Khalil
Australia correspondent

The Australian government was never going to come out of this saga looking good.
They've been on the back foot ever since Novak Djokovic announced he was coming to defend his Australian Open title.
The decision to cancel Djokovic's visa – after a court previously ruled in his favour – is largely about saving face with Australian voters in an election year.
To achieve this, the government is prepared to endure any diplomatic fallout, international embarrassment and the wrath of Djokovic's supporters.
Throughout the past two weeks, the federal government has been adamant to make a point: no-one is above the rules. Not even the men's world number one.
A simple, straightforward principle. But the way it's been handled has been anything but.
On the afternoon before Djokovic arrived, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the player would "be on the next plane home" if his documents were not in order on arrival in Melbourne.
"Rules are rules," Mr Morrison reiterated when Djokovic's visa was revoked the next day, on 6 January.
Mr Djokovic’s visa has been cancelled. Rules are rules, especially when it comes to our borders. No one is above these rules. Our strong border policies have been critical to Australia having one of the lowest death rates in the world from COVID, we are continuing to be vigilant.
When Djokovic challenged the decision, Mr Morrison said it was up to the court.
But suddenly the government's position began to look very shaky as it asked for more time – denied by a judge – to compile its legal case amid questions over federal procedures. It also faced scrutiny over why Djokovic had been allowed to get on a plane in the first place.
The whole thing could have ended when judge Anthony Kelly decided in Djokovic's favour – citing a bungle in the process at Melbourne Airport – and ordered the government to reinstate his visa and get him out of detention.
But it didn't.
The immigration minister, Alex Hawke, had the option to use his executive powers to cancel the visa and deport Djokovic and he did.
A lot has been said about the motivation behind this – mainly that it's political. And it is. The blaring politics is impossible to escape.
There are two things to consider here on the government's front.
First, the deep embarrassment this has caused the Morrison administration. To Australians and indeed to the world, politicians look like they are enforcing rules they themselves don't understand or are unclear about. They also seemed to not talk to each other.
One layer of government – the state of Victoria – was making decisions with Tennis Australia, in isolation. Federal officials were saying something entirely different. And the tournament organisers were complaining they'd been caught in between.
The second has to do more with Covid and less with tennis. The mood in the country is one of shock and fury. Australia's two most populous states, New South Wales and Victoria, have been reporting tens of thousands of cases for weeks now.
Testing clinics are still struggling and the number of deaths is also rising. Though it's not at the rate of, say, Europe or the US, this is Australia – a country that imposed some of the strictest Covid rules in the world. A country where, at times, a single case could push a whole city or state into lockdown.
Australians feel abandoned. They feel like things have turned so bad, so quickly. Many also say they've done everything that's been asked of them.
They got vaccinated and are now getting their boosters, But still, the Omicron variant is rampant around them leaving many asking what more they could've done.
Now juxtapose that picture against a tennis star who publicly said he opposed the vaccine and who admitted to breaking isolation rules while Covid positive, and to providing false information on his travel declaration form.
There's also that discrepancy about when he found out he had Covid. He said in his statement that week that he knew on 17 December. But the sworn affidavit he presented to the court said the positive test was confirmed on 16 December.
"If it were you or me," someone said on my Twitter feed, "Would they allow us in after all that?"
The simple answer is no.
There's no doubt that Scott Morrison's government has been bruised by this controversy.
The political tussling between state and federal governments; the breakdown of communication; the opaqueness of which rules apply to whom; an unvaccinated famous athlete that has broken Covid rules. It all makes for a messy picture that politicians have been trying to straighten out.
Given all that we know now, the government would have had a lot more to explain if they didn't cancel Novak Djokovic's visa.
Novak Djokovic and the unanswered questions
Australians fume over testing amid Omicron surge
Twists and turns of Djokovic's Australia mess
How Djokovic won his court case
Tsunami hits Tonga after giant volcano eruption
Djokovic detained ahead of Australian visa appeal
Baldwin hands phone to Rust shooting investigators
Ruthless royals move to limit Andrew damage
What's UK PM to do when kids joke about his future?
Is the pandemic entering its endgame?
Kazakhstan: Who sparked deadly violence? Video
Families' quest for hope years after air disaster
The world this week in pictures
How a colossal block of ice became an obsession
Omega Mart: Where art meets escape room. Video
Egypt's 'most exciting' archaeological discovery in decades
Body transformations kept strictly undercover…
Can they keep their progress hidden from their loved ones?
Why do good cops go bad?
Uncovering the story of one of America's most corrupt police units
© 2022 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read about our approach to external linking.

source

Hi. I am Muhammad Mubeen Hassan. I am SEO Expat and Wordpress Websites Developer &  Blogger. 30 years old. I help entrepreneurs become go-to in their industry. And, I like helping the next one in line. You can follow my journey on my blog, for list Click Here If you need any post so you can email me on my this Email: mubeenh782@gmail.com  

Continue Reading
Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

Business

What is an Ultrasound Tech Salary?

Published

on

The job of an ultrasound technician can be a thrilling one. It is a promising career with high pay and advantages. A lot of technician schools offer training programs for the area. If you take the time to obtain a degree or certificate in the ultrasound field, you’ll be able to earn an income worth the effort and time.

HOW MUCH DOES AN ULTRASOUND TECHNICIAN MAKE

Ultrasound salary rates are far more competitive than the majority of the positions in allied health. Some markets pay over $65,000 in this position. An ultrasound technician can expect to earn a median annual pay of $63,640 for diagnostic medical Sonographers as of May 2009, as per the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The salary may vary based on the kind of job setting. For instance, the median annual income in 2009 for employees working in doctor’s offices was $63,820. For hospital workers, it was $63,770. The salaries can also differ according to state and clearly by country. Similar to other occupations, ultrasound wages are less for entry-level employees and higher for those in higher-paying posts. If you earn greater than $65,000 per year and 55 percent are over 50, as well as 22 percent are under 30, According to the Society of Diagnostic Medical Sonography.

GET REGISTERED AND MAKE MORE MONEY

Technicians can expect less money even if they’re not certified by the American Registry of Diagnostic Medical Sonographers (ARDMS). However, the bottom 10% of technicians earn the least money, equivalent to $ 43,990 a year, and the higher 10% earn $85,950 yearly. Pay is also contingent on the number of specificities the technician holds. The more specialties the technician has, the more lucrative the salary. Employer, certification/education, or background may also affect the ultrasound salary. Hospital employees make $63,770 a year.

Doctors employ the second highest number of ultrasound techs in their clinics, and 13,290 technicians earn $63,820 annually. Diagnostic and medical labs use the third highest number of technicians, i.e., approximately 4,680. They pay each one $61,820 of them each year. Schools that teach pay roughly $66,000.

ultrasound

ultrasound

WHERE DO YOU LIVE

Furthermore, geographic locations are also a significant factor in determining how much pay a technician can earn. For example, Massachusetts has the highest ultrasound technician’s salary, around $78,460 annually. Oregon is almost identical, with a salary of $78,320. Colorado is third with approximately $77,380 annually. The need for technicians is huge in not developed states, while jobs have attained a saturation point in more developed states.

If a technician wishes to make the most money, it is recommended that they join those firms that offer employment services. They could earn as much as $68,000 or more annually. Enterprises and management companies offer the second highest pay, $67,890 per annum. Outpatient centers earn $64,560 annually, while educational schools have a salary of approximately $66,000. The structure of wages is also influenced by the environment in which the technician works, the workload the technician is responsible for on their own, and the company’s size. Experience in the field is significant to the average salary.

Continue Reading

Trending

%d bloggers like this: