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Facts And Comparison Of Data Interpretation And Logical Reasoning

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The dates of every CAT 2019 eventare finalized, and this year, there will be a rise in difficulty level. CAT 2019 examination will commence on 24th November 2019. In this article, we’ll discuss about the most significant section of CAT examination, which is Data Interpretation (DI) and Logical Reasoning (LR).

Yes, this section is now playing a very significant role in all the management entrance examinations. We’ll be analyzing some facts and differences between DILR and other sections. If you are a management examination aspirant, then keep reading this article till the end.

  • Facts about Data Interpretation (DI) and Logical Reasoning section (LR)
  • This is the only section in the entire management examinations where figures speak more than numbers or words. Many management experts claim that every official conduction bodies of management examinations try to focus more on the DILR section.
  • The reason is simple and straightforward; a future manager should analyze things by graphs. He/she should focus more on figures when it comes to business planning and consultancy.
  • Though there is less stability of DILR questions in examinations, students still have to face them. Every CAT topper states that to excel in any examination, you should prepare well for DILR.
  • DILR section is highly-rewarding, but it consumes a lot of time and effort. In the last 10 years, colleges and institutes are focusing more on DILR to test student’s accuracy and knowledge.
  • It becomes very important for every management aspirant to understand this section. If we focus particularly on LR, then the decision-making process comes into the picture. NMAT paper pattern entirely relies on LR questions. Students should concentrate more on Logical Reasoning.
  • Every management entrance examination is based on the decision-making process. LR is the section where students get confused while making decisions.
  • What are the important topics of the Data Interpretation and Logical Reasoning section?

Students should always aim to analyze the data and answer all the questions accurately. We all know that it’s a highly-time consuming section; students have to practice well and attempt multiple mock tests.Therefore we have analyzed previous year CAT question papers. In the below table, you can grab all the relevant topics with their weightage.

Important topics Weightage (in percentile)
Statements and Assumptions 10% to 12% (CAT 2017 to CAT 2018)
Blood Relations 5% to 10% (CAT 2016 to CAT 2019)
Clocks and Calendars 15 to 18% (CAT 2018)
Data Arrangement 5% to 10% (CAT 2017 to CAT 2018)
Seating Arrangement

15 to 20% (CAT 2018)

You can see that how much the DILR section plays a significant role in the CAT examination.

  • Detailed analysis of Data Interpretation and Logical Reasoning section
  • The last thing is comparing DILR with other sections. Apart from that, quick tips for the students to ace DILR.
  • Let’s start with the comparison of DILR with other sections. From the past 3 years, the weightage of DILR is rapidly growing in management examination.
  • In CAT 2016, the difficulty level of DILR questions increased. On the other hand, VARC and QA sections are fluctuating; we cannot predict the difficulty level of these sections.
  • Last year VARC was quite easy, and this year the difficulty level can increase. Both the VARC and QA sections are not time-consuming. A well-prepared student can easily attempt both the sections in less than 60 minutes.
  • In simpler words, a student should attempt the DILR section with at least80% accuracy level to score well in the CAT examination.

But wait, we have majorly focused on the DILR section in this article. But it doesn’t mean other sections are not that important. Your study plan should be well-balanced to become a successful future manager.

Hi. I am Muhammad Mubeen Hassan. I am SEO Expat and Wordpress Websites Developer &  Blogger. 27 years old. I help entrepreneurs become go-to in their industry. And, I like helping the next one in line. You can follow my journey on my blog,  Odyssey OnlineAll Note AbleB2B Guru PlanCross ArticleDj Soft WorldFinance PressHufforbesLife Health Press BusinessStrong ArticleThe Top StoriesUS Update ZoneBusiness TodayScience NewsEssay Writing AcademicElite Guide Health If you need any post so you can email me on my this Email: mubeenh782@gmail.com  

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Education

A 3-decade ‘moving picture’ of young Australians’ study, work and life, thanks to LSAY

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The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) unpack the lives of young Australians as they leave school, enter further study or the workforce and make the transition into adulthood.

The latest findings are now available for the group of young people who completed their first questionnaire back in 2009 at age 15. This group’s 11th and final survey shows young people are completing university at higher rates than ever before, while participation in apprenticeships and traineeships is taking a dive.

The information collected from these groups of students, or “cohorts”, is used to better understand what helps or hinders this transition. This includes things like the effect of schools on year 12 completion, whether government benefits like Youth Allowance help students complete their studies, and the factors that help a young person find full-time work sooner.

Each cohort starts with about 14,000 students in the first survey, or “wave”. From the age of 15 to 25, they complete a 20-minute survey once a year to share what’s been happening in their lives. LSAY asks about their experiences at school, their post-school study and work, as well as their health and home life.

Six cohorts have taken part so far. The recent release of findings from the fifth cohort’s final survey is a milestone, with LSAY data now available across three decades. This means we can study generational changes in transition patterns.

To capture the many changing events or factors that affect young peoples’ transition, the survey has added questions about caring responsibilities, volunteering activities, participation in the gig economy, their personality traits and whether they have access to social support.

Data dating back to the ’70s

LSAY is one of Australia’s biggest and longest-running panel surveys. More than 60,000 young people have been surveyed since 1995. It’s recognised as one of eight core longitudinal data assets in Australia.

The surveys grew out of the Youth in Transition (YIT) studies in the 1970s. The decade’s oil price shocks caused unemployment to soar, with young people hit the hardest. This created a need to better understand their school-to-work transition in the face of global technological and economic change.

Then came the Australian Longitudinal Surveys (ALS) and Australian Youth Surveys (AYS) in the 1980s. One of the more prominent pieces of research using these data found the aptitude of new teachers fell substantially as teacher pay declined compared to other salaries.

These three longitudinal studies were combined to create the LSAY program.

Researchers mine LSAY for insights

More than 300 published research papers have used LSAY data. The report 25 years of LSAY: Research from the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth showcases some of the highlights.

McDonald's worker hands over order at a drive-through counter.
LSAY shows working a few hours a week while at school helps get a full-time job later. Shutterstock

LSAY research has shown working just a few hours a week while at school improves prospects of getting a full-time job. But working long hours has a slightly negative effect on school completion. The research also found females are better at balancing school and work than their male peers.

Research has also shown that students participating in school-based vocational education and training (VET) had higher rates of school completion, full-time employment and incomes in their first year after school than non-VET students with similar characteristics. Ex-VET students were also more likely to be in a job they liked as a career. These benefits were associated with school-based VET programs with a workplace learning component.

The Productivity Commission used LSAY data to investigate the demand-driven university system. Many disadvantaged students successfully attended university as a result of the expansion of the system. However, those with lower literacy and numeracy were more likely to drop out. The study recognised schools and universities need to do more to prepare and support students, and that university might not always be the best option.

LSAY has been an important source of evidence for policy. National reviews and inquiries informed by LSAY data include the COAG Reform Council’s reporting on youth transitions (2009), the Bradley Review of Higher Education (2008) and the House of Representatives inquiry into combining school and work (2008-2009).

The recent Education Council Review of Senior Secondary Pathways, released in July, draws heavily on LSAY to establish how students can choose the best pathway for their transition from school.

LSAY has a high degree of comparability with international youth surveys. These include the Transition from Education to Employment (TREE) study in Switzerland, the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) in Canada, the Education Longitudinal Study (ELS) and National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) in the United States, and Next Steps in the UK.

Most of these have a starting sample of about 9,000 individuals. Next Steps has 16,000. LSAY’s starting sample of 14,000 young Australians makes it one of the largest surveys of its kind in the world.

Tracking lives through the GFC and COVID-19

These datasets enable us to transform a snapshot of a person’s life into a moving picture. Compared with cross-sectional studies, these longitudinal datasets provide a much clearer picture by accounting for personalities, life events and pathways.

Four fingers representing people with different personalities
The longitudinal dataset helps account for different personalities. Shutterstock

Combining a longitudinal study with cohort studies sheds more light on this picture by controlling for inter-generational differences, or crises such as wars, financial downturns or natural disasters.

For example, using data from four LSAY cohorts, one study found the well-being of those whose transitions occurred during the global financial crisis (GFC) was much worse on several measures, including standard of living, home life, career prospects, social life and independence.

The extraordinary challenges Australian youth face as a result of the coronavirus pandemic will be documented when the sixth LSAY cohort, now aged 20, complete their sixth survey in 2020 and further surveys in the years thereafter.

By providing a valuable resource to explore the longer-term effects of this crisis, LSAY continues to stand the test of time.

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