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Commentary: Donald Trump and Boris Johnson have many things in common,

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In awe, Americans looking from afar might be uninterested in what is happening in London. According to the article, the premier minister is reported at risk of being evicted from his home at 10 Downing Street because he lied. Astonishing.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson might survive, due to various reasons, including the fact that he, along with two of the five recent U.S. presidents (Bill Clinton and Donald Trump), has an incredible power that stems from his inability to embarrass. In addition, when his opponents criticize him, Johnson can efficiently respond, “What did you expect?”

He has never concealed his conviction that in any circumstance, honesty is just one option in a sea of others alternatives and is not preferentially over better or even more enjoyable alternatives. According to Winston Churchill, another politician (evidently the Prime Secretary Stanley Baldwin), he “occasionally had stumbled over the truth, but hastily picked himself up and hurried on as if nothing had happened.”

With his well-maintained hair, which appears to look like the barber was using pruning shears. His erratic method of bed-walking and his extravagant lifestyle, Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson — Eton; Balliol College, Oxford University — brings to mind the quip of Dolly Parton “You’d be surprised how much it costs to look this cheap.” An amount of thought appears to have been put into Johnson’s self-presentation of himself as unaffected by appearances, an average-looking man with worn-out shoes, a style that is rooted in grassroots. A naturally populist, he’s mastered the art of what Alexander Hamilton deplored (in Federalist 68) as “the little arts of popularity.”

Johnson’s current predicament is a result of pandemics. There were parties at his home, including his office, the basement, and the garden, all while the British citizens were suffering from strict lockdowns and stern scoldings and penalties and fines for evading their authorities.

There has been a lot of anger with Johnson’s rainbow of reactions has, include: No, there weren’t events (although the invitees were advised that they should “bring your own booze”). There were events, but Johnson didn’t have any idea about them. He was unaware that any of them counted as events. One party, perhaps, he stated: “Those people were at work talking about work.” In another instance party, the man “believed implicitly that this was a work event.”

Sixty years ago, in the scandal of Profumo (a Secretary of State for War had lied during the House of Commons about an affair with a young lady), This doggerel was in vogue: “To lie in the nude / Maybe rude / But to lie in the House is obscene.”

The Economist declares Johnson “possibly the biggest cynic ever to become prime minister.” He was dismissed from a prominent position in journalism after he invented the phrase. An ex-conservative leader fired him from a post in the government because he lay. His rise up to Downing Street was propelled by his efforts to promote Brexit, Britain’s departure from the European Union. He posed with smoking a smoked kipper and slammed at the European Union for the regulation that requires such fish to be shipped using firm pillows — a law drafted in the hands of government officials from the British government. He warned bizarrely that Turkey is set to be joining the European Union. He said that withdrawing from this European Union would free 350 million pounds ($480 million) per week for the National Health Service. A fact gleaned from the same source from which Trump was able to get his pledge to end his U.S. national debt in eight years.

In The Financial Times, Rory Stewart is, an ex-Conservative cabinet minister, who is now a professor at Yale University, says Johnson “is an awful prime minister and is a rotten human being. However, he’s not an unnatural creature that has sprung up from the gap between this globe and the following.” Most Conservative MPs have voted to make Johnson the prime minister following “thirty years of fame has made him famous for his sexiness, indifference to details, incompetence in administration and the utter disregard for any personal pledge.” The reason for this, Stewart says, is because British culture “remains bound by the notion that politics is an art form.”

Mortality is a social animal, and Americans can take comfort from saying that British counterparts have produced the same type of leader who was as reckless and incompetent as the current and possibly likely president. However, there is an informative contrast.

Simon Kuper notes in the Financial Times that Johnson’s net score for favorability fell from 29 percent in April of 2020 to just -52% by January 2022. “Here, in microcosm,” Kuper writes, “is the uniqueness of American polarisation” That is, those who are in favor of Trump are tied to him like the hoops made of steel no matter whatever. The complete disregard for facts is today’s “American exceptionalism.”

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Former Tesla Employees Sue The Company Over An Alleged Abusive Behaviour Reminiscent.

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Kaylen Barker, a Black woman who worked in the Tesla manufacturing facility, filed a lawsuit last week in California asserting that the automaker allows “rampant acts of racism” within its manufacturing facilities.

The lawsuit of Barker details a string of racist incidents that escalated in 2023, which the automaker was said to have been unaware of until a colleague hit her with a “hot tool”, at her and slammed her with a racial insult and used insulting words. The confrontation resulted in Barker with a swollen thigh, and she is still suffering “emotional distress, humiliation, shame and embarrassment,” according to the suit.

The offender was fired and rehired 2 weeks later, per the lawsuit. The lawsuit states that Barker was employed at the Tesla factory in Lathrop, California.

“Being a Black worker at a Tesla’s renowned California factory is to be forced to step back in time and suffer painful abuses reminiscent of the Jim Crow era,” the lawsuit claims.

The lawsuit that Barker filed in the Superior Court of California claims that she was subjected to harassment following her appointment to supervise coworkers working in the brakes department of Tesla vehicles.

The suit claims an employee claimed that the “Black girl” should not be promoted over her and Barker “is Black and doesn’t know anything.”

Barker, 25, who is 25, said she would inform Tesla’s Human Resources department “and” her supervisor after each incident of racism; however, Barker wasn’t informed of any corrective measures taking place until the incident involving that hot instrument, as stated in the lawsuit.

Tesla has not responded to a request for comments.

The automaker has faced allegations of racism issues in its work environment before.

Owen Diaz, a former Tesla employee, received $136.9 million in compensation last year when the jury found that the company discriminated against racial minorities in the workplace. Others Tesla employees have been suing in recent times, accusing the company of having a toxic environment within its manufacturing facility.

Tesla was unconvinced of the verdict in the case of Diaz.

“While we strongly believe that these facts don’t justify the verdict reached by the jury in San Francisco, we do recognize that in 2015 and 2016 we were not perfect,” Valerie Capers Workman, Tesla’s vice president at the time of employees, wrote in an article on the Tesla blog. “We’re still far from being perfect. However, we’ve come quite many steps from 5 months ago.”

Workman left Tesla in late March, per her LinkedIn profile, and released Tesla’s first equity, diversity and inclusion report in 2023.

Black as well as African American employees are 10 per cent of Tesla’s US workforce, as per the 2020 report. Additionally, women make up 21% of the US workforce. Women comprise 17% of the top leadership positions in Tesla’s US workforce.

Tesla isn’t the only automaker to have employees who have been able to report experiencing racism in the production plant.

A lawsuit filed in 2018 by General Motors described nooses being hanging and “whites-only” written on a bathroom. GM has stated in the past that harassment and discrimination are unacceptable and to treat any reported incident with compassion and urgency. Ford has also been sued, claiming it discriminates against people of colour. Ford has stated that it is against discrimination and takes allegations seriously.

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